Unilever seeks climate neutrality by 2030 | RetailDetail

Unilever seeks climate neutrality by 2030

Unilever seeks climate neutrality by 2030

Unilever seeks to be climate neutral by 2030, which means it will have to drastically lower its processing procedures' emission levels. The food manufacturer will also have to draw energy from 100 % renewable sources.

Continuance of 2010 Living Plan

The British-Dutch group has a history when it comes to sustainability: back in 2010, it launched the Unilever Sustainable Living Plan with three specific goals in mind, namely to double the company's size and at the same time lower its environmental footprint and increase its social impact.


As some 200 countries try to reach deals to counter climate change at the Paris climate summit, Unilever CEO Paul Polman divulged the company's increasingly ambitious plans: it wants to become climate neutral and get all of its energy from renewable sources by 2030. When it comes to electricity, Unilever wants to move even faster, getting all of its electricity from renewable sources by 2020. That means it will eliminate its dependency on coal and increase its renewable energy capabilities, which currently stand at 40 % of its entire energy need.


Polman also feels immediate action is necessary, because a World Bank Group report says an additional 100 million people will become impoverished if the temperatures continue to rise.


That is why he hopes strict deals will be made in Paris, like to prevent additional deforestation. Polman hopes there will be sanctions for those who do not adhere to the new goals.


Criticism to presence at climate summit

Several environmental activists have complained about the presence of business leaders at the Paris climate summit, but Polman firmly disagrees: "We will apply additional pressure on politicians to get a good agreement. Besides, in some areas, companies contribute more financially than governments."


Unilever has also backed Belgian sustainability network The Shift's stance. This organization includes several hundred CEO's (like AB InBev, Ageas, Atlas Copco, Alpro, AXA, BASF, Bpost, Eneco, Janssen Pharmaceutica, Sodexo and Solvay), people from society organizations and scholars who all ask the Ministers involved to create a sound climate agreement. They have already expressed their disappointment at the fact that there is still no agreement in place between the different regions in Belgium about who should carry which responsibility.

Questions or comments? Please feel free to contact the editors

CEO Peter Somers wants to take RetailDetail to the next level


RetailDetail has a new CEO: e-commerce entrepreneur and former bpost board member Peter Somers has major growth ambitions for the company.

"Protectionism makes everyone poorer" (Christian Verschueren, EuroCommerce)


Trade wars and discrimination within the single market create growing pressures on retailers in Europe. EuroCommerce Director-General Christian Verschueren is concerned, but looks forward confidently to the future.

Belgian online turnover surpasses 10 billion euro


Online commerce is becoming increasingly popular, in Belgium as well. Online turnover in the country rose to 10.05 billion euro last year, reaching the ten billion milestone for the first time. However, there is still a lot of growth potential online.

Claire’s files for bankruptcy


American chain Claire’s has now officially filed for bankruptcy, although it only relates to the company’s American division.

Amazon looks for additional cuts with manufacturers


Amazon wants to cut costs and that is why it will charge manufacturers with logistical fees more quickly. Up until now, the American online retailer often took it upon itself, but that move no longer seems profitable.

Amazon targets Toys 'R' Us stores


Amazon is apparently interested in several of bankrupt Toys ‘R’ Us’ stores, because their locations and stores would fit Amazon’s own retail formulas.

Back to top