14 days of reconsidering allowed for online purchases

The European Parliament and the members of the European Union have reached an agreement to protect the online consumers even better. The period in which they can return products will be extended from one to two weeks after delivery.

 

Also for Tupperwareparties, not for digital music

This extended period is valid for e-commerce transactions, but also for online auctions and even home party sales (e.g. Tupperware nights). Online purchase of digital music, films and software is exempt from the new rules. The sellers are obliged to inform the customers clearly about this waiting period: if they do not, that period is automatically prolonged to one year.

 

No more 'hidden' costs or long delivery delays


The European Parliament has also decided that extra costs, caused by automatically checked fields in internet forms, are forbidden and that products should be delivered within 30 days. It also wanted to force the seller to refund the forwarding prices if the product costs more than 40 euro, but that proposition has been rejected by the member states: the seller still only has to refund the purchasing price.

The ministers of each EU member state will have to agree to the agreement, which would be passed probably by the end of June.

The European Parliament and the members of the European Union have reached an agreement to protect the online consumers even better. The period in which they can return products will be extended from one to two weeks after delivery.

 

Also for Tupperwareparties, not for digital music

This extended period is valid for e-commerce transactions, but also for online auctions and even home party sales (e.g. Tupperware nights). Online purchase of digital music, films and software is exempt from the new rules. The sellers are obliged to inform the customers clearly about this waiting period: if they do not, that period is automatically prolonged to one year.

 

No more 'hidden' costs or long delivery delays


The European Parliament has also decided that extra costs, caused by automatically checked fields in internet forms, are forbidden and that products should be delivered within 30 days. It also wanted to force the seller to refund the forwarding prices if the product costs more than 40 euro, but that proposition has been rejected by the member states: the seller still only has to refund the purchasing price.

The ministers of each EU member state will have to agree to the agreement, which would be passed probably by the end of June.

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