Lay’s bans artificial additives from its crisps

Lay’s bans artificial additives from its crisps

Crisp producer Lay’s has started banning all artificial conservatives, colourings and flavour enhancers from its products. By the summer of 2014 all crisps will be produced by a "more natural" recipe.

Demand of the consumer

The scrapping of all artificial conservatives, colourings and flavour enhancers from crisps is the direct result of a consumer survey of 2010. On the question when consumers considered a product as “natural”, the absence of artificial colourings, conservatives and flavour enhancers was the most common answer.

 

The challenge was coming up with a recipe without artificial additives, while preserving the taste. Because adjusting the recipe is complex and time consuming, the different Lay’s recipes will be adjusted in several phases. Today several flavours such as Bolognese, Heinz Tomato Ketchup and Natural are all available without artificial additives.

 

By the summer of 2014 all varieties will be prepared according to the new recipe. Lay’s will state on the package if the flavour is already being produced without artificial additives.

 

Third step toward more “honest” product

Lay’s says it has been working for five years to gradually improve the recipe of its crisps. This is the third big step in a “process towards a more honest product”, says the brand.

 

In 2007 Lay’s replaced palm oil by sunflower oil, which reduced the amount of saturated fats by 70%. In 2011 the brand cut back on the usage of salt by 25% and now the company removes all artificial conservatives, colourings and flavour enhancers from its crisps.

 

“This adjustment is in line with the intention of parent company PepsiCo to improve the compounds of a series of diverse products (from cereals to juices and crisps). Enjoying more responsibly is the message”, they say.

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