Americans approve modified salmon for human consumption | RetailDetail

Americans approve modified salmon for human consumption

Americans approve modified salmon for human consumption

The American Food and Drug Administration has approved genetically modified Atlantic salmon for human consumption. It is the first time a living creature has been labeled as such.

Salmon grows faster

Genetically-modified crops have been around for quite a while now, but it is the first time a genetically-modified creature has been approved for human consumption.


Five years ago, the FDA deemed the genetically-modified salmon, bred with AquaBounty technology, to be as safe as a regular salmon. Its genes were modified to make it grow faster, by adding a gene from a salmon found in the Pacific into an Atlantic salmon. Now, the latter will grow all year around and only needs about half the time of a regular salmon before it can be harvested.


This particular modified salmon can now also enter the food chain and does not even need a special label as it has the same food characteristics as its non-modified version.


Consumers and stores protest

Not everyone is in favour of this decision, with particularly those opposed to genetically modified organisms in full voice. Several department store chains (including Kroger and Target) have also informed they will not include this new type of salmon in their product range.


According to AquaBounty's CEO Ronald Stotish, his technology allows to get more efficiency out of fish without having to empty the oceans. As the earth's population rises, that may become a valid reason, especially as this fish only needs to eat 1 kilogram to actually gain 1 kilogram, a better conversion than most other species. Transport costs will also drop as the fish can be produced locally as well.

Questions or comments? Please feel free to contact the editors

Dior exchanges Belgian CFO for British one


After eleven years as Dior Homme’s Chief Creative Officer, Belgian Kris Van Assche is to leave the fashion label to find new challenges. British designer Kim Jones will replace him.

Suitcase brand Rimowa cancels all dealer contracts


Suitcase brand Rimowa, part of luxury group LVMH since 2016, has stopped all of its dealer contracts. It wants to initiate a new procedure soon and only a fraction of the current dealers will get a new contract.

H&M disappoints once again


Swedish fashion chain Hennes & Mauritz had to present less than favourable results for its new fiscal year: investor trust has dwindled, now that sales in its home territory have also dropped for the first time in decades.

Bureau of Competition approves Yoox Net-a-Porter bid


The Italian Bureau of Competition has approved Swiss Richemont’s acquisition of Italian fashion webshop Yoox Net-a-Porter. The full bid, yet to be accepted, values the company at 2.7 billion euro.

Donatella Versace stops using fur


Italian fashion brand Versace will no longer use fur: designer Donatella Versace no longer wants to kill animals for fashion, she explained in an interview with The Economist.

"Best year ever" for Danish shoe brand Ecco


Ecco can look back on 2017 as its best financial year ever. The Danish shoe brand, known for its “follow the foot” philosophy, exceeded its own expectations thanks to an 8 % growth.

Back to top