Regulations e-commerce barely different throughout Benelux

Regulations e-commerce barely different throughout Benelux

Good news for those who want to start an online shop for the entire Benelux: according to a research by national consumer watchdogs of Belgium, the Netherland and Luxembourg there are no major differences in legislation about e-commerce between the three countries.

Purchase-money and cooling-off period

The differences are quite small, mostly because the regulations for online shops are based on European guidelines. There can however be differences in interpretation when those guidelines are transformed in national regulations, but those seem smaller than expected in the three areas that got a closer look: terms and conditions, right of withdrawal and disclosure requirements.

 

Concerning terms and conditions the three countries had the same regulations, except for the amount a webshop can demand with an order. According to Belgian and Luxembourg regulations the retailer can demand the complete amount before delivery, whereas in the Netherlands an option to pay at least half of the amount after delivery has to be present.

 

Also about the right of withdrawal there are almost no differences, except about the legal cooling-off period: in the Netherlands and Luxembourg you have seven working days to return an item, in Belgium you get fourteen days. When talking about disclosure requirements (price including delivery, specifications of the product, right of withdrawal and the address of the retailer) there are no difference between the three countries.

 

To inform consumers as well as retailers about their rights and obligations, the three countries have each made a practical guide. They can be found on the websites of the Belgian Ministry of Economy, the Dutch Consumer Authority and the Luxembourg Ministry of Economy and International Trade.

Questions or comments? Please feel free to contact the editors


Dutch eCommerce industry faces shortage of employees

17/07/2017

Dutch eCommerce companies struggle to find sufficient employees to handle the industry’s growth. More than half of the companies have job openings that can hardly be filled.

Alibaba launches its own intelligent speaker

05/07/2017

Chinese Alibaba has now also entered the intelligent speaker market, following Amazon, Apple and Google. Its main attraction is that the speaker is a lot cheaper than the competition. A small group can now trial the device for one month.

Media-Saturn wants to turn back Redcoon acquisition

27/06/2017

Media-Saturn has adopted a very peculiar strategy to get web shop Redcoon’s losses to disappear. It filed a lawsuit to retroactively cancel its 2011 acquisition.

Europe hands Google record fine

27/06/2017

According to the European Commission, Google took advantage of its market position to more prominently feature its own products in the search results. The fine is an astonishing 2.42 billion euro.

Metro Group invests in mobile payment solution

27/06/2017

German Metro Group invested in British start-up Yoyo Wallet, a rapidly-growing European mobile payment service. Together with other companies, Metro Group invested 14 million euro in Yoyo Wallet.

Ikea launches store on Amazon

19/06/2017

Only a week after Ikea’s announcement about third party sales, the Swedish furniture store chain reveals its own store on Amazon, filled with an extensive product range.

Back to top