Less packaging = lower costs + more goodwill

An overwhelming majority of the British would like to reduce their waste production to zero, says research service IGD. 70% is in favour of recycling all packaging, composting all organic waste and... actually eating all the food they bought.

 

Save up to 530 euro for a household, up to 2 billion for Wal-Mart (per year)


WRAP (Waste & Resources Action Programme), a programme through which authorities and companies work to use materials as efficiently as possible, calculated that every British home can save up to £480 (€530) – mainly in food that is now bought just to be thrown away later.

All of this would not mean that ecology would cost retailers dearly – on the contrary: they can make a lot of money with it. Wal-Mart for example was able to save over two billion euro as a result of using less packaging. Even for a company as huge as Wal-Mart, whose profit rose over 15 billion dollar last year, this is an enormous amount of money.

Wal-Mart logoOther American retailers have been following Wal-Mart's successful example: SuperValue has decided to decrease waste production by 90% in 40 of its supermarkets. This is of course a different scale than Wal-Mart's 4400, but it still helps. Moves like these also add to the good, green image of retailers – which in turn generates goodwill with potential future customers.

 

A strong incentive - and a stronger warning


Even though “green” is good, for retailers profitability is paramount – and also for consumers this is important: many Britons want to receive a compensation for the effort these measures will take, like a tax cut or a direct cash bonus. But even without this compensation, 62% of the British is “in theory” in favour of recycling – even more if the packages are picked up from each doorstep.

Moreover, 60% says they will use reusable bags in the future to go shopping, but even more important: 36% vow to boycott products with too much packaging. Suppliers will have to listen to this warning, and not only to reduce their own costs...

 

 

An overwhelming majority of the British would like to reduce their waste production to zero, says research service IGD. 70% is in favour of recycling all packaging, composting all organic waste and... actually eating all the food they bought.

 

Save up to 530 euro for a household, up to 2 billion for Wal-Mart (per year)


WRAP (Waste & Resources Action Programme), a programme through which authorities and companies work to use materials as efficiently as possible, calculated that every British home can save up to £480 (€530) – mainly in food that is now bought just to be thrown away later.

All of this would not mean that ecology would cost retailers dearly – on the contrary: they can make a lot of money with it. Wal-Mart for example was able to save over two billion euro as a result of using less packaging. Even for a company as huge as Wal-Mart, whose profit rose over 15 billion dollar last year, this is an enormous amount of money.

Wal-Mart logoOther American retailers have been following Wal-Mart's successful example: SuperValue has decided to decrease waste production by 90% in 40 of its supermarkets. This is of course a different scale than Wal-Mart's 4400, but it still helps. Moves like these also add to the good, green image of retailers – which in turn generates goodwill with potential future customers.

 

A strong incentive - and a stronger warning


Even though “green” is good, for retailers profitability is paramount – and also for consumers this is important: many Britons want to receive a compensation for the effort these measures will take, like a tax cut or a direct cash bonus. But even without this compensation, 62% of the British is “in theory” in favour of recycling – even more if the packages are picked up from each doorstep.

Moreover, 60% says they will use reusable bags in the future to go shopping, but even more important: 36% vow to boycott products with too much packaging. Suppliers will have to listen to this warning, and not only to reduce their own costs...

 

 

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