Greenpeace rebrands 28 H&M stores for "Detox Now" campaign | RetailDetail

Greenpeace rebrands 28 H&M stores for "Detox Now" campaign

In eleven European countries (plus Hong Kong), climate activists staged a Greenpeace action to “rebrand” H&M stores for their “Detox Now!” campaign. In nearly thirty stores, mostly in Northern countries, huge stickers were pasted on windows in an attempt to force the Swedish fashion retailer into stopping collaborations with polluting Chinese factories.

"Dirty laundry" report shows toxic pollution in China's main rivers

The Detox Now-campaign started in July, with the publication of the Dirty Laundry report. In that report, Greenpeace proved that several of the main clothing producers in the world (like Nike, Adidas, Puma, Calvin Klein, H&M, Converse or Abercrombie and Fitch) had contracts with Chinese suppliers that discharge a range of hazardous and persistent chemicals with hormone-disrupting properties in Chinese rivers like the Yangtze or the Pearl River, of which millions of people depend for their drinking water. 

 

The Detox Now-campaign specifically focuses on these worldwide brands. “As brand owners, they are in the best position to influence the environmental impacts of production and to work together with their suppliers to eliminate the releases of all hazardous chemicals from the production process and their product”, says Greenpeace. “As one of the largest clothing groups in the world, an H&M committed to a toxic-free future would set the trend for the rest of the fashion industry to follow”, is Greenpeace's hope. 

Puma, Nike, Adidas already agreed to halt chemical discharge

H&M is the fourth major brand to be tackled by Greenpeace, after Puma (immediately after the report publication), Nike (mid-August) and Adidas (end of August) had already promised to halt the discharge of toxic chemicals. So far, H&M has not officially responded to Greenpeace's allegations, but its head of CSR Helena Helmersson has said that the Swedes “always want to improve and share Greenpeace´s ambition to eliminate hazardous chemicals throughout the entire textile production. That is why we will continue our dialogue with Greenpeace this week to see how we together can take another step forward.”

In eleven European countries (plus Hong Kong), climate activists staged a Greenpeace action to “rebrand” H&M stores for their “Detox Now!” campaign. In nearly thirty stores, mostly in Northern countries, huge stickers were pasted on windows in an attempt to force the Swedish fashion retailer into stopping collaborations with polluting Chinese factories.

"Dirty laundry" report shows toxic pollution in China's main rivers

The Detox Now-campaign started in July, with the publication of the Dirty Laundry report. In that report, Greenpeace proved that several of the main clothing producers in the world (like Nike, Adidas, Puma, Calvin Klein, H&M, Converse or Abercrombie and Fitch) had contracts with Chinese suppliers that discharge a range of hazardous and persistent chemicals with hormone-disrupting properties in Chinese rivers like the Yangtze or the Pearl River, of which millions of people depend for their drinking water. 

 

The Detox Now-campaign specifically focuses on these worldwide brands. “As brand owners, they are in the best position to influence the environmental impacts of production and to work together with their suppliers to eliminate the releases of all hazardous chemicals from the production process and their product”, says Greenpeace. “As one of the largest clothing groups in the world, an H&M committed to a toxic-free future would set the trend for the rest of the fashion industry to follow”, is Greenpeace's hope. 

Puma, Nike, Adidas already agreed to halt chemical discharge

H&M is the fourth major brand to be tackled by Greenpeace, after Puma (immediately after the report publication), Nike (mid-August) and Adidas (end of August) had already promised to halt the discharge of toxic chemicals. So far, H&M has not officially responded to Greenpeace's allegations, but its head of CSR Helena Helmersson has said that the Swedes “always want to improve and share Greenpeace´s ambition to eliminate hazardous chemicals throughout the entire textile production. That is why we will continue our dialogue with Greenpeace this week to see how we together can take another step forward.”

Questions or comments? Please feel free to contact the editors


Discounters' major opportunities for growth in Western Europe

16/07/2018

Despite the multitude of stores in most European markets, discounters plan to open up to ten million square metres of store surface in five years' time. Even in so-called saturated markets they still see a lot of chances for growth, LZ Retailytics says.

Contamination bites huge chunks of Greenyard's value

16/07/2018

Vegetable producer Greenyard is under attack after a listeria contamination in its Hungarian factory. The company says to have taken all necessary measures, but the share price plummets.

Starbucks dumps plastic straws worldwide

12/07/2018

American coffee company Starbucks will ban plastic straws in their stores starting from 2020. A small step for coffee enthusiasts, but a big step for the environment, as the coffee giant uses about a billion straws every year.

AB InBev joins forces with Efes in Russia

12/07/2018

In order to counter the decline of their success on the Russian market, Belgian beer giant AB InBev has placed its activities in Russia in a joint venture with Turkish Anadolu Efes.

Jumbo appoints new head of Belgian branch

11/07/2018

Dutch Jumbo Groep Holding has made a management reshuffle, with Peter Isaac becoming the new managing director of the group's Belgian branch. Bart van den Nieuwenhof meanwhile is set to leave the group's restaurant chain La Place.

Snacks boost Pepsico’s sales

10/07/2018

Snack and beverage giant Pepsico has recorded a slight revenue growth of 2.4 % in the second quarter of this year. Net profit however went 14 % lower, due to rising taxes.