Status quo for outdoor brand Jack Wolfskin

Status quo for outdoor brand Jack Wolfskin

German outdoor brand Jack Wolfskin had sales worth 351 million euro in 2012. Those numbers are almost equal with the financial year 2011, where sales rose by no less than 22.5%.

More equipment, less footwear

Jack Wolfskin did not fare well in Germany and Austria, still the biggest market for the German company with the famous wolf paw in the logo. It did however grow in Asia, Great-Britain and Eastern Europe. While the sales of clothing stabilised, there was a pretty rise in the department ‘equipment’ (outdoor accessories), but that rise could not compensate for the drop in sales of footwear (-8%).

 

CEO Michael Rupp was not unhappy though: “Despite the extremely unfavourable weather conditions, a lack of innovation and surplus stocks from last year, we managed to defend our position against the competition and continue to grow outside of our core markets.”

 

Innovation and international growth

COO of Jack Wolfskin Christian Brandt says the company will up its renewal percentage for the coming summer and winter season considerably and their investments in R&D have also risen. “In addition, we will continue to refine the brand profile and work more on the quality of our distribution,” said Christian Brandt.

 

The company also wants to have more Jack Wolfskin Stores in franchise: Rupp sees a possibility for growth in Asia, Great-Britain and Eastern Europa. It is there they will strengthen their activities and investments. At the moment the company has 350 stores in franchise in Europe and almost 500 in China. The brand is also for sale in 4,000 multi-brand shops.

 

At the end of the financial year 2012 the company had 700 employees, 70 more than the year before.

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