Hugo Boss is becoming more animal-friendly

Hugo Boss is becoming more animal-friendly

Clothing manufacturer Hugo Boss will limit the purchase of natural fur to byproducts from animal husbandry. Fur from raccoon dogs, foxes and Rex rabbits will be banned.

Only farm fur

Starting with its Fall/Winter 2016 collection, Hugo Boss will only use fur from farmyard animals to accessorize its clothing. Fur from raccoon dogs, foxes or Rex rabbits will no longer be used. On top of that, the company says it has found innovative materials that can be used instead of fur, while they can also still meet the high quality expectations set forth by the consumer.

 

Not only fur, but also wool has been a focus for Hugo Boss: like with fur, it will no longer use Angora rabbit wool, starting with its Fall/Winter 2016 collections. The Angora rabbit is specifically bred on an industrial scale to accommodate the clothing industry.

 

It is also re-evaluating its Merino wool purchase as it wants nothing to do with companies that are involved in so-called mulesing. This involves cutting away skin around the sheep's backside, often without sedation, to prevent it from becoming an infection hazard. Knitting wear suppliers will have to provide a certificate proving its wool is mulesing-free. The goal is to reach 90 % by 2020.

 

It is also investigating the option of vegetable fibers as an alternative. Hugo Boss also no longer wants any products from animals that have been force-fed or that are plucked alive. Every material has to be fully traceable, it says in its sustainability report. Animal rights groups, like Gaia, have applauded the clothing group's decision.

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