Cambodian and Haitian clothing workers demand higher wages | RetailDetail

Cambodian and Haitian clothing workers demand higher wages

Cambodian and Haitian clothing workers demand higher wages

After the long and semi-successful struggle of their colleagues in Bangladesh, now also Cambodian and Haitian textile factory workers are demanding higher wages. The governments in both countries have increased minimum wages slightly already, but labour unions want a significant increase.

Cambodia: "Our members demand 160 dollars"

Both countries have seen protests for quite a while: Cambodia had to deal with severe protests in May and November, when a woman died and several dozens were injured after a harsh police intervention. Just last week, some 300,000 Cambodian textile workers went on strike. During the strike a lot of factories closed down, fearing massive destruction. The closure seems to have cost the local textile industry some 10 million euro per day.

 

The minimum wage was subsequently increased from 95 dollars (69 euro) to 100 dollars (73 euro) per month in order to avoid further losses, but the Cambodian textile workers demand 160 dollar (117 euro) per month. “As long as we do not get it, we will keep on protesting”, the labour union president has said to fashion website WWD. Labour rights organization Solidarity Center believes the wage increase is a first step, as it shows the government is willing to negotiate.

 

Haiti: workers find first increase ridiculous

The Haitian minimum wage was also increased recently, after protests in its capital Port-au-Prince. The minimum wage was lifted from 200 Haitian gourde (3.65 euro) to 225 gourde (3.73 euro). Haïti 17, the labour union for the textile sector, finds the increase "ridiculously low" and demands a 500 gourde (8.29 euro) minimum wage per day. The labour union believes that amount would enable workers to fulfil their basic needs.

 

The Haitian textile industry makes up 90 % of the country’s export, bringing in 440 million euro per year. 31,000 people work in the sector. Manufacturers fear they will not be able to compete with other countries if the wage costs keep rising. According to the industry, wages are already 4 times higher than in Bangladesh.

 

 

 

 

(Translated by Gary Peeters)

 

Questions or comments? Please feel free to contact the editors


Colruyt removes Nestlé products from its shelves

21/02/2018

Colruyt has taken at least 18 Nestlé products from its shelves, because it failed to reach a deal about the pricing. For that reason, the products have been temporarily removed from Colruyt stores.

Supermarkets react to European farmer welfare proposal

20/02/2018

Some supermarkets are not happy about the European Commission’s intention to give farmers higher prices. Dutch, German, Austrian distributors warn this will lead to higher prices for the consumers.

Jupiler will disappear for a few months

20/02/2018

AB InBev’s latest marketing stunt is rather unusual: its popular Jupiler brand will disappear from the shelves until July. In order to “support” the Red Devils at the World Cup football (or to benefit from their popularity), it will be rebranded to Belgium.

Colruyt joins PostNL's grocery service

20/02/2018

The mailman will deliver groceries every two weeks from now on: PostNL will collaborate with new grocery service Stockon in the Netherlands. A remarkable fact is that its private label brands are Boni, which is Belgian supermarket chain Colruyt’s private label.

European purchase alliance Agecore puts pressure on Nestlé

16/02/2018

European purchase alliance, Agecore, has threatened to cut 160 Nestlé products from its list unless the Swiss agree to better conditions. Colruyt, Coop and Edeka are members of Agecore.

Kraft Heinz does not meet expectations

16/02/2018

American Kraft Heinz failed to live up to analysts’ fourth quarter expectations, both when it comes to turnover and profit. It did manage a 900 % increase of its profit, but that did not convince any analyst.

Back to top