Explosions in Ikea: possible blackmail attempt (update) | RetailDetail

Explosions in Ikea: possible blackmail attempt (update)

Three IKEA stores in Belgium, the Netherlands and France had to be closed after several explosions had occurred on Monday. After a long security check, all stores have been cleared to open again the next morning.

 

Three stores hit in three different countries (but close to each other)

The first store where the packages exploded was in North-French Lille. Two separate explosions in the kitchen department were too small to hurt anyone. Not even an hour away (by car) lies the IKEA store of Ghent (Belgium), where two more small bombs exploded. While not bigger than the French explosions, in the Ghent explosions two staff members were hurt because a customer had heard clocks ticking and warned security.

90 minutes later, another package exploded in a garbage can on the parking lot of Eindhoven's IKEA and again, nobody was hurt. One remarkable fact is that, while perfectly on the line Lille – Ghent – Eindhoven (E17/E34-roads), the IKEA of Antwerp was left unharmed.

Police have searched for more such packages in the three stores (and a few others), but found no other explosives. All IKEA shops therefore opened just like normal on Tuesday morning, but the Belgian trade unions did ask for another security audit.

 

Earlier bomb threats on Dutch IKEA stores

It is not the first time that (Dutch) IKEA stores had to deal with alleged bombs. In 2002, two Poles put several bombs in the stores of Sliedrecht and Amsterdam. They asked for 250,000 euro, but got eleven years of imprisonment instead. Seven years later, a woman called the police claiming that there was a bomb in IKEA's Amsterdam South East store – there was none.

As the modus operandi is the same in all the stores, police are guessing there is a connection between the events. Each of the small bombs, hidden in a milk can, consisted of a small quantity of gunpowder, a detonator and an alarm clock. One website noted that it was “quite appropriate that the bombs in the stores famous for self-assembly devices were home made”.

So far, nothing about motive or culprits is known. It does not keep the press from guessing: some point a finger to angry farmers because of the recent arguments about give-away steaks, while others think of Eastern-European amateurs.

Three IKEA stores in Belgium, the Netherlands and France had to be closed after several explosions had occurred on Monday. After a long security check, all stores have been cleared to open again the next morning.

 

Three stores hit in three different countries (but close to each other)

The first store where the packages exploded was in North-French Lille. Two separate explosions in the kitchen department were too small to hurt anyone. Not even an hour away (by car) lies the IKEA store of Ghent (Belgium), where two more small bombs exploded. While not bigger than the French explosions, in the Ghent explosions two staff members were hurt because a customer had heard clocks ticking and warned security.

90 minutes later, another package exploded in a garbage can on the parking lot of Eindhoven's IKEA and again, nobody was hurt. One remarkable fact is that, while perfectly on the line Lille – Ghent – Eindhoven (E17/E34-roads), the IKEA of Antwerp was left unharmed.

Police have searched for more such packages in the three stores (and a few others), but found no other explosives. All IKEA shops therefore opened just like normal on Tuesday morning, but the Belgian trade unions did ask for another security audit.

 

Earlier bomb threats on Dutch IKEA stores

It is not the first time that (Dutch) IKEA stores had to deal with alleged bombs. In 2002, two Poles put several bombs in the stores of Sliedrecht and Amsterdam. They asked for 250,000 euro, but got eleven years of imprisonment instead. Seven years later, a woman called the police claiming that there was a bomb in IKEA's Amsterdam South East store – there was none.

As the modus operandi is the same in all the stores, police are guessing there is a connection between the events. Each of the small bombs, hidden in a milk can, consisted of a small quantity of gunpowder, a detonator and an alarm clock. One website noted that it was “quite appropriate that the bombs in the stores famous for self-assembly devices were home made”.

So far, nothing about motive or culprits is known. It does not keep the press from guessing: some point a finger to angry farmers because of the recent arguments about give-away steaks, while others think of Eastern-European amateurs.

Questions or comments? Please feel free to contact the editors


Ikea plans to cut 150 jobs, including in Belgium and the Netherlands

04/05/2018

Ikea will be cutting 150 jobs, some of them in the Belgian and Dutch branches as well. The plan is part of a major reorganisation effort to help prepare the furniture giant for the growing competition of large e-commerce players.

Beter Bed suffers from poor German results

02/05/2018

Dutch mattresses group Beter Bed Holding saw its first quarter turnover drop 4 % compared to last year. Turnover went down in Germany, where a poison scandal forced results down by 12 %, but Switzerland and Spain performed even worse.

Jysk targets 100 Belgian stores

23/04/2018

Danish Jysk will open another eleven stores in Belgium in 2018, bringing its total to seventeen. The Danish counterpart to Ikea aims to have about 100 stores in Belgium at some point.

Carpetright shuts down 20 % of its UK stores

13/04/2018

Carpetright, caught in a downward spiral in the past year, will shut down a fifth of its stores in Great Britain in order to remain afloat. 300 people will subsequently lose their job.

Ikea plans city store in heart of Paris

10/04/2018

Ikea is fully focused on becoming a global presence in urban centers. The furniture chain is currently looking for locations in Paris, Copenhagen, London and Southeast Asia to attract broader audiences with smaller stores.

“Ikea deducted a billion euro too much from its taxes”

29/03/2018

In the past six years, Ikea unlawfully deducted about one billion euro from its taxes according to the European Commission’s preliminary findings. The EC launched an investigation into the Swedish company’s deal with the Dutch treasury.