British department store John Lewis expands web shop to Belgium

British up-market department store chain John Lewis has expanded its internet shop to serving Belgium today. This is just a first step in this country, as the chain has quite some more plans if the introduction proves successful.

 

Expansion to Belgium now, the rest of the EU next autumn

The British, Irish, French, Danish and Swedes are already familiar with John Lewis, and now the Belgium, the Netherlands, Germany, Greece, Italy, Portugal and Spain can enjoy the chain's services – with the US, Canada, Australia, New-Zealand, Norway and most of the remaining EU countries joining the club next autumn.

 

No other currencies or languages accepted - for now

This is just a first step for the British retailer, who plans to expand its empire to the rest of the world step by step. While the current web shop is monolithic and monolingual, the plan includes localisation so that each country will have the web site available in its own language(s). Once that step is complete, the chain hopes to open physical stores in continental Europe too.

 

For the time being however, the website will be uniquely British – it will even not accept payment in euros. “The acceptance of the European currency will be included in the localisation process that also includes the introduction of other languages to our web shop”, said online manager Emma McLaughlin to the Financiële Telegraaf.

 

From Oxford Street to the rest of the world

John Lewis's first store opened in Oxford Street, London in 1864 and since then, the chain has expanded to 37 British stores and one web shop. After Britain, John Lewis now wants to conquer Europe and the rest of the world. The first step is creating a web presence in these countries: “To make a more significant investment, we need to be confident that the demand is worth it”, commercial director Andrea O'Donnell told the Financial Times in February, when the plan still was to expand to the rest of the EU in one go.


Johnlewis.com realised a £567 million (€635 million) turnover in 2010, 38% more than the year before. This year, the group hopes to cross the £700 million threshold (€784 million) and aims at a foreign share of 1 to 5%.

British up-market department store chain John Lewis has expanded its internet shop to serving Belgium today. This is just a first step in this country, as the chain has quite some more plans if the introduction proves successful.

 

Expansion to Belgium now, the rest of the EU next autumn

The British, Irish, French, Danish and Swedes are already familiar with John Lewis, and now the Belgium, the Netherlands, Germany, Greece, Italy, Portugal and Spain can enjoy the chain's services – with the US, Canada, Australia, New-Zealand, Norway and most of the remaining EU countries joining the club next autumn.

 

No other currencies or languages accepted - for now

This is just a first step for the British retailer, who plans to expand its empire to the rest of the world step by step. While the current web shop is monolithic and monolingual, the plan includes localisation so that each country will have the web site available in its own language(s). Once that step is complete, the chain hopes to open physical stores in continental Europe too.

 

For the time being however, the website will be uniquely British – it will even not accept payment in euros. “The acceptance of the European currency will be included in the localisation process that also includes the introduction of other languages to our web shop”, said online manager Emma McLaughlin to the Financiële Telegraaf.

 

From Oxford Street to the rest of the world

John Lewis's first store opened in Oxford Street, London in 1864 and since then, the chain has expanded to 37 British stores and one web shop. After Britain, John Lewis now wants to conquer Europe and the rest of the world. The first step is creating a web presence in these countries: “To make a more significant investment, we need to be confident that the demand is worth it”, commercial director Andrea O'Donnell told the Financial Times in February, when the plan still was to expand to the rest of the EU in one go.


Johnlewis.com realised a £567 million (€635 million) turnover in 2010, 38% more than the year before. This year, the group hopes to cross the £700 million threshold (€784 million) and aims at a foreign share of 1 to 5%.

Questions or comments? Please feel free to contact the editors


Technology as a 'margin pressure reliever'

19/06/2017

Technology is able to improve productivity of retailers in various sections within their operations, according to McKinsey. The options are numerous: shelf-stacking robots, back office/workflow process automation, delivery via drones and so on.

Insight: five conclusions following the Amazon - Whole Foods deal

19/06/2017

It was as clear as day that Amazon would one day acquire a supermarket chain, but nevertheless, the news hit everyone like a bombshell. What are the consequences for food retailers worldwide? 

Hudson's Bay Nederland presents brand portfolio

15/06/2017

Hudson's Bay Nederland presented its brand portfolio as part of its preparations for its first ten stores. It is the first time the Canadian company opens a store abroad and it will position itself completely differently.

Are Nike, Universal Studios and Sanrio blocking free competition?

15/06/2017

A week after Brussels targeted American clothing brand Guess, Nike, Universal Studios and Sanrio are now also being examined. They all may have breached the European Union’s regulations regarding sales across borders and online sales.

"Price breakers destroy the economy"

14/06/2017

According to political scientist Jonathan Holslag, consumers have to shop more consciously and stay away from price breakers like Action and Primark because those “destroy the economy”. He feels people should shop at local stores more often.

Are Fnac and Carrefour France's new power couple?

14/06/2017

Are Carrefour and Fnac Darty about to be joined in holy matrimony now that Fnac CEO Alexandre Bompard will lead Carrefour? Can a wandering supermarket chain, a culture-focused company bouncing back and a popular electronics retailer make French retail “great again”?

Back to top